If they die, will we prosper?


 

It has been an interesting few days on the “timternet”, with the mainstream media having finally caught up with what many of us have known for a long time, (thanks to some excellent work from some indefatigable bloggers and investigative journalists) namely that our great rivals, Glasgow Rangers, are teetering on the edge of financial oblivion.
 
Craig Whyte can no-longer be seen as the “Whyte Knight”, claims that his wealth is “off the radar” have now been proven to be patently untrue. In fact official statements emanating from Ibrox bring to mind the dying days of the Saddam Hussein regime in Iraq, Craig Whyte’s statements that selling of the season ticket money four seasons in advance is a viable and normal business practice, are as grounded in reality as “Comical Ali” telling the world that the infidels would be sent back to their families in body bags, while US tanks rolled into Baghdad just over his shoulder. For US tanks read Hector the Tax Inspector.
 
Once our laughter has subsided (oh and how we laughed at that “cheery chappy” McCoist storming out of Ibrox with a face like a skelped bairn after his pleading for some financial backing went unheeded) there remains a relevant, and intriguing question. It boils down to this, do we need them?
 
When the host of this site asked this question on twitter, the response was overwhelmingly that no, we do not.
 
Oh and it really is ever so tempting to ride along with the “let them die” mentality. When you think of their arrogance, their apologists in the media, their long history of shaming our national game, and by association, our nation itself. A world without Rangers, the birds would sing, the sun would shine, and the common man would realise that there is more that unites him with his neighbour, than divides them.
 
Before we get too carried away, we must cast our minds back to a time when we held a knife to the throat of our enemy. In Gordon Strachan’s last season in charge we held a convincing lead over a poor Rangers side, four in a row was a near certainty, the wee ginger one though, wasn’t so sure, he felt we needed reinforcements, Steven Fletcher of our traditional feeder club Hibernian was the target. Lawell and co. however disagreed, they felt our squad was strong enough. Fletch stayed in Edinburgh and almost inconceivably the league flag flew over Ibrox come the start of the next season. The Plc had shown their true colours, they harbour no real ambition except to stay ahead of our cross city rivals, they knew that criticism of them and their dealings would be muted as long as domestic trophies continued to pile up in the Celtic Park trophy room.  Of course we all know that even this most modest of targets has been missed, that however is a debate for another day. The point is, under its current stewardship our club needs (as hard as it is to say) Rangers to constantly push us to do better.
 
If Rangers disappear, Celtic would survive, but in a vegetative state. Instead of the rest of Scottish football raising its standards to challenge us, we would undoubtedly sink to their level.
 
Surely what we want is Celtic to challenge (at least sporadically) on the European stage again? For us to continually strive to be better? For this we need something (no matter how abhorrent we find it as an institution) to constantly push us domestically. Due to the nature of the changes money has imposed upon our game, that challenge will never again come from Aberdeen or Dundee United, it must come from Rangers.
 
The one caveat to this is if we were able to gain entry to another league, then we could truly rejoice in their demise, knowing our future was bright (green). However after years of pimping our entire league on the basis of our regular hate filled scraps with them, would Celtic alone have the same appeal to the TV executives that will come to deicide footballs structure in the not too distant future?
 
One final point, tax evasion and financial doping are a cancer on not just football but society in general. And just as Fred Goodwin had his title stripped from him for leaving behind a financial “scorched earth” so too should Rangers have the titles they bought, with money that was not theirs, removed from their records. This may never happen, but one thing is for sure, their history is forever tainted.

 
 
 

Comments

  1. Well put but I have to respectfully disagree.
    Rangers as they exist now bring nothing positive to our sport or our country. There will always be a place for a football side to represent the native and protestant aspect of our shared west of Scotland culture. However I would suggest Rangets as it currently exists no longer does that. A rethink.and rebuilding of the Rangers tradition is long overdue.
    As for us we are bigger than them. A truly global club, potentially as big as Man United or Liverpool. The concept of the “old firm” has only ever held us backc associating our brand with tawdry religious bigotry.
    I wish their fans, who after all our our workmates, our brothers and sisters and often our lovers well. But we are better off without them until yogurt deal with their issues

    1. Thanks for your response James, Interesting viewpoint I have to say, I agree we are bigger than them and have the potential to be as big as any team in the world. I just worry that because for so long we have been associated with them (the hated “old firm” tag) that the money men who now run football would see us as less of a financially lucrative addition to their league if we did not come with all the bile and hate (which is what we have sold our league on for years now) that our rivalry with them brings.
      My issue though is mainly with the current board, I just fear that without a viable threat from Rangers their fetish for a healthy bottom line would mean a further dumbing down of the on park product.
      Unlucky with that predictive text error, it made you look ever so slightly mad!

  2. Well put but I have to respectfully disagree.
    Rangers as they exist now bring nothing positive to our sport or our country. There will always be a place for a football side to represent the native and protestant aspect of our shared west of Scotland culture. However I would suggest Rangets as it currently exists no longer does that. A rethink.and rebuilding of the Rangers tradition is long overdue.
    As for us we are bigger than them. A truly global club, potentially as big as Man United or Liverpool. The concept of the “old firm” has only ever held us backc associating our brand with tawdry religious bigotry.
    I wish their fans, who after all our our workmates, our brothers and sisters and often our lovers well. But we are better off without them until yogurt deal with their issues

    1. Thanks for your response James, Interesting viewpoint I have to say, I agree we are bigger than them and have the potential to be as big as any team in the world. I just worry that because for so long we have been associated with them (the hated “old firm” tag) that the money men who now run football would see us as less of a financially lucrative addition to their league if we did not come with all the bile and hate (which is what we have sold our league on for years now) that our rivalry with them brings.
      My issue though is mainly with the current board, I just fear that without a viable threat from Rangers their fetish for a healthy bottom line would mean a further dumbing down of the on park product.
      Unlucky with that predictive text error, it made you look ever so slightly mad!

  3. “Yoghurt” is a product of predictive text. Should have been until they deal with their issues.
    #blush

  4. “Yoghurt” is a product of predictive text. Should have been until they deal with their issues.
    #blush

  5. I have to say, grudgingly, yes we do need them, as it’s them and us that are the only true attraction to TV and advertisers alike, we are already bought on the cheap, if we were left as the only viable force and attraction in Scottish football it would be the end as we know it.
    If Revenue dwindelled to such a level as could be imagined, could Celtic survive in the current state? Could Celtic afford Celtic Park?
    And on another note, if Rangers do go to the wall (which I doubt) they could start again, afresh, would they choose to do so in Scotland? Or would they take the oportunity to head down south where all the money is?
    Someowhat of a double edged sword don’t you think?
    It’s not like they would start with the finances of a small local team, but would have massive resources in comparison to their peers, this would give them a massive advantage and I’m sure it wouldn’t take a generation to climb the league, thus attracting advertising, because even under another name, their support, locally and internationally would remain.
    On another note, the no click script is a PITA!

    1. Thanks sparkybhoy, I think the problem is we have allowed ourselves to be sold as a package (“the old firm”) and I due to this I fear our value would diminish if it was just us. The same could be applied to Spain at the moment with Real and Barca. Rivalries and controversies are what TV execs want!
      What the future would hold and what form a Rangers 2012 would take is an interesting point (I also doubt they will go to the wall). Either way, interesting times ahead.
      Thanks for taking the time to comment, much appreciated.

  6. I have to say, grudgingly, yes we do need them, as it’s them and us that are the only true attraction to TV and advertisers alike, we are already bought on the cheap, if we were left as the only viable force and attraction in Scottish football it would be the end as we know it.
    If Revenue dwindelled to such a level as could be imagined, could Celtic survive in the current state? Could Celtic afford Celtic Park?
    And on another note, if Rangers do go to the wall (which I doubt) they could start again, afresh, would they choose to do so in Scotland? Or would they take the oportunity to head down south where all the money is?
    Someowhat of a double edged sword don’t you think?
    It’s not like they would start with the finances of a small local team, but would have massive resources in comparison to their peers, this would give them a massive advantage and I’m sure it wouldn’t take a generation to climb the league, thus attracting advertising, because even under another name, their support, locally and internationally would remain.
    On another note, the no click script is a PITA!

    1. Thanks sparkybhoy, I think the problem is we have allowed ourselves to be sold as a package (“the old firm”) and I due to this I fear our value would diminish if it was just us. The same could be applied to Spain at the moment with Real and Barca. Rivalries and controversies are what TV execs want!
      What the future would hold and what form a Rangers 2012 would take is an interesting point (I also doubt they will go to the wall). Either way, interesting times ahead.
      Thanks for taking the time to comment, much appreciated.

  7. In my view a much more likely outcome would be this taken as an opportunity to review Scottish football as a whole.
    A redistribution of the wealth would take place leading to the Aberdeens, Hearts, Dundee Utd and Hibs of this world becoming bigger clubs.
    It would also force an element of youth development which would be healthy for the game.
    You mention money driving the game, that era is coming to an end, and Rangers possible demise is only one symptom of this. The future will need to be based on sustainable businesses, and I mean worldwide, not just Scottish football.

    1. Fair enough, you are obviously a more positive person than me!
      I would worry that there would be no wealth to re-distribute as surely SKY and ESPN would attempt to renegotiate down the existing TV deal.
      However I fully agree that this should be used as an opportunity to reform our game, encourage youth development etc. Lets hope we learn the lessons of Rangers cataclysmic failure. Football clubs must be substainable.
      Cheers for reading and commenting

  8. In my view a much more likely outcome would be this taken as an opportunity to review Scottish football as a whole.
    A redistribution of the wealth would take place leading to the Aberdeens, Hearts, Dundee Utd and Hibs of this world becoming bigger clubs.
    It would also force an element of youth development which would be healthy for the game.
    You mention money driving the game, that era is coming to an end, and Rangers possible demise is only one symptom of this. The future will need to be based on sustainable businesses, and I mean worldwide, not just Scottish football.

    1. Fair enough, you are obviously a more positive person than me!
      I would worry that there would be no wealth to re-distribute as surely SKY and ESPN would attempt to renegotiate down the existing TV deal.
      However I fully agree that this should be used as an opportunity to reform our game, encourage youth development etc. Lets hope we learn the lessons of Rangers cataclysmic failure. Football clubs must be substainable.
      Cheers for reading and commenting

  9. Nice article. I would say we need them. I love beating them and seeing other teams do the same! I agree that they’re supporters need to leave the primitive mentality behind, but don’t see it happening. They’re not fundamental to our league, but without them our league would be even worse than it is right now! All thats going to rescue them from abolition is serendipitous! They’re going to have to grin and ‘bear it, excuse the pun and suffer the consequences until a miracle happens. But an SPL with them wouldn’t be the same. Hail Hail

    1. Cheers pal, glad you enjoyed the article, just thought I would put forward the other side of the debate, there has been plenty of (justified) gloating in their potential demise but I’m not sure it would really benefit us in the medium to long term.
      Astonished their fans haven’t been more active in trying to halt the clubs decline, just glad our fans were more switched on and organised back in the 90s Hail Hail

  10. Nice article. I would say we need them. I love beating them and seeing other teams do the same! I agree that they’re supporters need to leave the primitive mentality behind, but don’t see it happening. They’re not fundamental to our league, but without them our league would be even worse than it is right now! All thats going to rescue them from abolition is serendipitous! They’re going to have to grin and ‘bear it, excuse the pun and suffer the consequences until a miracle happens. But an SPL with them wouldn’t be the same. Hail Hail

    1. Cheers pal, glad you enjoyed the article, just thought I would put forward the other side of the debate, there has been plenty of (justified) gloating in their potential demise but I’m not sure it would really benefit us in the medium to long term.
      Astonished their fans haven’t been more active in trying to halt the clubs decline, just glad our fans were more switched on and organised back in the 90s Hail Hail

  11. To pick up on a point about clubs being forced (due to financial constraints) to develop youth talent, this can only be a good thing and would surely benefit Scottish football as a whole, and of course the national team, the only obvious down side, the best players would be cherry picked by clubs down south but of course that would also bring in revenue for the clubs with the best youth development programme.
    Scottish football is in need of restructuring large scale, both to protest it from the cherry pickers and to make it a more attractive commodity.
    2 points I’d like to see introduced as a matter of urgency,
    1) Players under 23 that have been developed by a club should be protected from the cherry pickers with minimum compensation awards plus any agreed fee.
    2) Two up two down, this would create excitement and the desire to fight at both ends of the table.

    1. Can’t argue with either of your points to be fair, the future of Scottish football and ourselves will surely involve selling our best talent for the best available price. We need legislation to protect teams investments in youth. Two up two down is long overdue.

  12. To pick up on a point about clubs being forced (due to financial constraints) to develop youth talent, this can only be a good thing and would surely benefit Scottish football as a whole, and of course the national team, the only obvious down side, the best players would be cherry picked by clubs down south but of course that would also bring in revenue for the clubs with the best youth development programme.
    Scottish football is in need of restructuring large scale, both to protest it from the cherry pickers and to make it a more attractive commodity.
    2 points I’d like to see introduced as a matter of urgency,
    1) Players under 23 that have been developed by a club should be protected from the cherry pickers with minimum compensation awards plus any agreed fee.
    2) Two up two down, this would create excitement and the desire to fight at both ends of the table.

    1. Can’t argue with either of your points to be fair, the future of Scottish football and ourselves will surely involve selling our best talent for the best available price. We need legislation to protect teams investments in youth. Two up two down is long overdue.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.