My Fears for an Independent Scotland

I really want independence for Scotland. I’m sure we will have a good relationship with the rest of the British Isles and most countries around the world.
There are lots of questions to be sorted like which currency we have, our security, Will we be part of NATO or will we stick to a Scottish defence force ? Should the Queen of England be our head of state?
Personally I would go for a total separation and the creation of a republican state or I don’t see the point of Independence.
However my main concern is this. I believe that within the next 25 years there will be a 32 county Republic of Ireland. The current projection is that within that time scale there will be more nationalists in N.Ireland than unionists which will lead to a referendum. If that is the case the ‘Ulster Scots’ the very people whose ancestors were sent to Ireland to displace the indigenous population to protect the British Crowns interests will have a choice to make.
If Ireland becomes a nation again my fear is that these ‘Ulster Scots’ will attempt to move back to Scotland and inflame the sectarian divide that we have at present. This could lead to civil unrest in Scotland especially the west of Scotland and Glasgow in particular.
If this scenario comes about the English and Irish Governments have a huge responsibility to ensure these people stay in Ireland and Integrate with the Irish population otherwise we will end up with the nightmare scenario where these people move to Scotland and cause civil unrest with the Roman Catholic/Irish population here.
I think we have enough idiots here just now without adding to the problem. No doubt the Daily Record and The Sun would welcome these people with open arms and suggest that Scots of Irish decent should ‘go home’ if they don’t like it.
The bottom line is we need total Independence from England including their currency, armed forces and Monarchy or a referendum is just a waste of time.

Comments

  1. Don’t agree at all to be honest! This is just the first step to an independent Scotland. Some concessions made just now will work in our favour over the longer term, allowing our nation to prosper. Once that’s done and independence is secure, you can start to press for other changes and it becomes easier to enable these more politically delicate changes.

  2. Don’t agree at all to be honest! This is just the first step to an independent Scotland. Some concessions made just now will work in our favour over the longer term, allowing our nation to prosper. Once that’s done and independence is secure, you can start to press for other changes and it becomes easier to enable these more politically delicate changes.

  3. Couldn’t agree more, my foot is firmly in the “Yes” camp Jas, for the similar reasons, I want a complete free Scotland a Scotland that is not part of war all over the world, killing people all over the world, wasting millions of pounds all over the world. If the vote is yes, we still keep the Monarchy, and you are right, that side of the vote would cause division like never before in the West of Scotland should Ireland be free. So what is being traded here? A peaceful Ireland for a Social War in Scotland? I think that statement right there may push many Scots to vote no. I am no expert on what will happen in Ireland, but speaking to the many Irish people I do it seems on the cards at some point.
    Already the VILE hatred is in Scotland and like you Jas I don’t want to see it being added to. We all, yes people and no people need to have this debate. We can’t shy away from debate, this debate has to be had and it will, on TV and other platforms as we get closer to the date.
    These things still need done
    Autumn/winter 2012
    Electoral Commission begins the practical preparations, including testing the fairness and clarity of the question – This part has been achieved
    February 2013
    The Section 30 Order will be agreed by the Privy Council
    Spring 2013
    The Referendum Bill comes before Holyrood
    October 2013
    MSPs take part in the crucial Stage 3 vote at the Scottish Parliament
    November 2013
    Royal Assent is given to the bill
    The Scottish government will publish a White Paper – what it calls its “prospectus for independence”.
    Other parties will also put forward their vision for the future of Scotland
    Summer 2014
    The pro-independence and anti-independence campaigns intensify
    Autumn 2014
    The Scottish independence referendum takes place
    Once all the above happens, and we are standing to vote, I will be voting with ONLY Scotland in my thoughts. And I hope every Scottish born person does also. If we vote on this with the thoughts of any other country in our minds, we shouldn’t be voting.
    Good blog, and one that I was expecting somewhere soon, and there will be many more as we go through this year and into next. I will vote yes for my reasons, I don’t want my county in illegal wars wasting money killing people. That would be my main reason for “Yes”
    This is a BIG vote, once we are on out own, we are “on our own” and its a big world, with many enemies. But with luck we turn our back on a warring world. I just hope what Jas said above does not come true. As I have thought about it. If I thought 20/25 years down the road, when my kids are my age, that Scotland would become an independent shythole for idiots to spout vile religious crap at each other.
    I may think again.
    Blogger

  4. Couldn’t agree more, my foot is firmly in the “Yes” camp Jas, for the similar reasons, I want a complete free Scotland a Scotland that is not part of war all over the world, killing people all over the world, wasting millions of pounds all over the world. If the vote is yes, we still keep the Monarchy, and you are right, that side of the vote would cause division like never before in the West of Scotland should Ireland be free. So what is being traded here? A peaceful Ireland for a Social War in Scotland? I think that statement right there may push many Scots to vote no. I am no expert on what will happen in Ireland, but speaking to the many Irish people I do it seems on the cards at some point.
    Already the VILE hatred is in Scotland and like you Jas I don’t want to see it being added to. We all, yes people and no people need to have this debate. We can’t shy away from debate, this debate has to be had and it will, on TV and other platforms as we get closer to the date.
    These things still need done
    Autumn/winter 2012
    Electoral Commission begins the practical preparations, including testing the fairness and clarity of the question – This part has been achieved
    February 2013
    The Section 30 Order will be agreed by the Privy Council
    Spring 2013
    The Referendum Bill comes before Holyrood
    October 2013
    MSPs take part in the crucial Stage 3 vote at the Scottish Parliament
    November 2013
    Royal Assent is given to the bill
    The Scottish government will publish a White Paper – what it calls its “prospectus for independence”.
    Other parties will also put forward their vision for the future of Scotland
    Summer 2014
    The pro-independence and anti-independence campaigns intensify
    Autumn 2014
    The Scottish independence referendum takes place
    Once all the above happens, and we are standing to vote, I will be voting with ONLY Scotland in my thoughts. And I hope every Scottish born person does also. If we vote on this with the thoughts of any other country in our minds, we shouldn’t be voting.
    Good blog, and one that I was expecting somewhere soon, and there will be many more as we go through this year and into next. I will vote yes for my reasons, I don’t want my county in illegal wars wasting money killing people. That would be my main reason for “Yes”
    This is a BIG vote, once we are on out own, we are “on our own” and its a big world, with many enemies. But with luck we turn our back on a warring world. I just hope what Jas said above does not come true. As I have thought about it. If I thought 20/25 years down the road, when my kids are my age, that Scotland would become an independent shythole for idiots to spout vile religious crap at each other.
    I may think again.
    Blogger

  5. Please refrain from bringing Ireland into the Scottish question. Ireland is a foreign country, even though it is the place of origin for many Scots families. When we break from the Union, we will leave Ulster behind. What happens then is up to its citizens.
    Our problem is that we will be a minority in the country of our birth, one which has been oppressed for generations, constantly battling against the instinctive racism and bigotry of an establishment which has consistently refused to legislate against its own worst elements. When votes are required by any political party in the new People’s Republic of Bonnie Scotland, what guarantees have we that the Orange card won’t be played? I saw this in my home town in the early ’90’s, and that card was played by……. the Scottish Nationalist candidate.
    I want my country to break away from the Union, but I want this question addressed soberly and frankly dealt with first.
    Take a lesson from history; ask yourself what happened to the Jews who fought for Germany in the First World War?

    1. donnygaul
      I wish it was as simple as leaving other countries behind no matter the circumstances. We are global now and in that broad environment it will be only natural that those who feel disenfranchised will seek comfort in the familiar. The people of Ulster, I fear, will see Scotland as their comfort zone of choice. If only it were not the case, but………and who will prevent them. If it happens it will be a question of how prepared rather than how can we prevent.
      H H

  6. Please refrain from bringing Ireland into the Scottish question. Ireland is a foreign country, even though it is the place of origin for many Scots families. When we break from the Union, we will leave Ulster behind. What happens then is up to its citizens.
    Our problem is that we will be a minority in the country of our birth, one which has been oppressed for generations, constantly battling against the instinctive racism and bigotry of an establishment which has consistently refused to legislate against its own worst elements. When votes are required by any political party in the new People’s Republic of Bonnie Scotland, what guarantees have we that the Orange card won’t be played? I saw this in my home town in the early ’90’s, and that card was played by……. the Scottish Nationalist candidate.
    I want my country to break away from the Union, but I want this question addressed soberly and frankly dealt with first.
    Take a lesson from history; ask yourself what happened to the Jews who fought for Germany in the First World War?

    1. donnygaul
      I wish it was as simple as leaving other countries behind no matter the circumstances. We are global now and in that broad environment it will be only natural that those who feel disenfranchised will seek comfort in the familiar. The people of Ulster, I fear, will see Scotland as their comfort zone of choice. If only it were not the case, but………and who will prevent them. If it happens it will be a question of how prepared rather than how can we prevent.
      H H

  7. my family came here from Donegal in the late 1800’s and i have relatives that have served in the forces to protect the country. I am scottish, independence wont change that.. i dont know what it would change an dam not sure we have the politicians or the leaders in situ who could move the country forward and deal with the people who will no doubt wish to stay loyal to the UK….I just dunno and more importantly no sure if i care

    1. Yeah some will always want to stay loyal to the UK and the Queen. No argument there. And this is my worry. In terms of caring. Hard one. I don’t think Alex Salmond is the man, but if gets us there, then we can choose another we had two good speakers in Galloway and Sheridan but the left the path they were on.. If we are going to do this, we become 100% free from the world, we trade yes, but the need for wars and millions wasted on war would be gone (That would be good)
      I don’t care for politics or politicians either John, but this is a big vote, and if it is yes, our world changes. But I listed the things still needing to be seen to. Long road ahead. I try not to care, but like many, I have kids and for them, I need to care.
      Good debate going here.
      Blogger

  8. my family came here from Donegal in the late 1800’s and i have relatives that have served in the forces to protect the country. I am scottish, independence wont change that.. i dont know what it would change an dam not sure we have the politicians or the leaders in situ who could move the country forward and deal with the people who will no doubt wish to stay loyal to the UK….I just dunno and more importantly no sure if i care

    1. Yeah some will always want to stay loyal to the UK and the Queen. No argument there. And this is my worry. In terms of caring. Hard one. I don’t think Alex Salmond is the man, but if gets us there, then we can choose another we had two good speakers in Galloway and Sheridan but the left the path they were on.. If we are going to do this, we become 100% free from the world, we trade yes, but the need for wars and millions wasted on war would be gone (That would be good)
      I don’t care for politics or politicians either John, but this is a big vote, and if it is yes, our world changes. But I listed the things still needing to be seen to. Long road ahead. I try not to care, but like many, I have kids and for them, I need to care.
      Good debate going here.
      Blogger

  9. I see your point but unless an independent Scotland doesn’t get membership of the EU then nothing can stop people from N. Ireland, Ireland, England, Poland, France, Germany or any of the current 27 EU states – soon to be added to by Romania & Bulgaria from coming to Scotland to settle as “normal” law abiding citizens or coming here to make trouble.
    No amount of “new laws” would work as they would be against EU law on freedom of movement – don’t get me wrong I dislike the EU law on freedom of movement and think countries should have at least some control over their boarders – but I don’t make the laws!
    Yes I think there will be a united Ireland before too long – always thought it would happen but never thought I’d see it in my life time! I don’t think all the unionist will come to an independent Scotland – some yes as they’ll have family connections here, but I honestly think most will (maybe more hopeful than anything else) stay in N. Ireland with the rest heading to their “unionist motherland of England.
    I think it is right to have fears and to plan as best for potential “bad situations” that could arise but I think any that do will be slow in forming – initially – and if the right pressures are put on them to nip them in the bud e.g. long sentences for sectarian/religious/hate crimes and laws specifically targeting intolerance due to specific reasons – laws that would pass the EU courts – something that could be worked on & planned for in advance Then we have a real good shot at building a country that can stand alone with it’s head held high in any company. Sure we’ll have problems with intolerance all countries do that’s what you get with mass and generally unregulated movements of populations. All countries have these problems to some extent – it’s how you deal with them and respond to those who are causing them that marks you out as a great nation.

    1. Mike
      I had not seen your post before writing mine. You put forward an extremely strong argument regarding EU law. I doubt that even with the potential for violence that the EU would allow any exemption from its existing laws. It certainly has no history of giving in to challenge no matter how apparently justified. Your premise may tie in in some way with my initial notion that there really is no true independence in the modern world.
      H H

    2. Cheers Mike, Like pensionerbhoy you bring some real
      issues to the table that we have to address.
      If we choose Independence that will be no more than the first baby step of a new Scotland as the issues we face regarding Europe, defence, and economic development etc will take many years to sort out.
      Thanks for your contribution #HH

  10. I see your point but unless an independent Scotland doesn’t get membership of the EU then nothing can stop people from N. Ireland, Ireland, England, Poland, France, Germany or any of the current 27 EU states – soon to be added to by Romania & Bulgaria from coming to Scotland to settle as “normal” law abiding citizens or coming here to make trouble.
    No amount of “new laws” would work as they would be against EU law on freedom of movement – don’t get me wrong I dislike the EU law on freedom of movement and think countries should have at least some control over their boarders – but I don’t make the laws!
    Yes I think there will be a united Ireland before too long – always thought it would happen but never thought I’d see it in my life time! I don’t think all the unionist will come to an independent Scotland – some yes as they’ll have family connections here, but I honestly think most will (maybe more hopeful than anything else) stay in N. Ireland with the rest heading to their “unionist motherland of England.
    I think it is right to have fears and to plan as best for potential “bad situations” that could arise but I think any that do will be slow in forming – initially – and if the right pressures are put on them to nip them in the bud e.g. long sentences for sectarian/religious/hate crimes and laws specifically targeting intolerance due to specific reasons – laws that would pass the EU courts – something that could be worked on & planned for in advance Then we have a real good shot at building a country that can stand alone with it’s head held high in any company. Sure we’ll have problems with intolerance all countries do that’s what you get with mass and generally unregulated movements of populations. All countries have these problems to some extent – it’s how you deal with them and respond to those who are causing them that marks you out as a great nation.

    1. Mike
      I had not seen your post before writing mine. You put forward an extremely strong argument regarding EU law. I doubt that even with the potential for violence that the EU would allow any exemption from its existing laws. It certainly has no history of giving in to challenge no matter how apparently justified. Your premise may tie in in some way with my initial notion that there really is no true independence in the modern world.
      H H

    2. Cheers Mike, Like pensionerbhoy you bring some real
      issues to the table that we have to address.
      If we choose Independence that will be no more than the first baby step of a new Scotland as the issues we face regarding Europe, defence, and economic development etc will take many years to sort out.
      Thanks for your contribution #HH

  11. donnygaul57 You’d have been as well saying don’t bring any EU countries in to it. But the fact is the EU now has open boarders and no right to restrict any EU nationals from moving to another EU country to settle, work, or cause trouble – nothing can be done about it unless you remove said country from the EU and put up proper boarder controls.
    Whilst I appreciate your sentiment and see where you’re coming from the changes in the EU over the past few years mean that Ireland (north or south) or any other country in the EU will come in to the “Scottish question” at some point.

  12. donnygaul57 You’d have been as well saying don’t bring any EU countries in to it. But the fact is the EU now has open boarders and no right to restrict any EU nationals from moving to another EU country to settle, work, or cause trouble – nothing can be done about it unless you remove said country from the EU and put up proper boarder controls.
    Whilst I appreciate your sentiment and see where you’re coming from the changes in the EU over the past few years mean that Ireland (north or south) or any other country in the EU will come in to the “Scottish question” at some point.

  13. JasCam
    I am absolutely Scottish through and through. I do not feel that way for any nationalistic reasons as I find they are stuffed full with emotion and rarely with substance or rational. They actually tend to annoy me. I do so, rather, because I have a respect for and pride in the society that weaned me and a deeply founded love of the local environment and wider landscapes of the country in which I was privileged to grow. Living in the North East of England as I have now for over fifteen years, I find myself, somewhat paradoxically, proclaiming even greater fondness of that wonderful land in spite of all the present internal upheavals. I do believe that, if genuine, it is only a reaction to the English thing. It is probably more likely to be a twisted personal wind-up ploy of mine.
    In spite of “mouthing” a great deal about politics, when it really comes down to it, I have to confess that I waiver a great deal as I am never sure which camp I should dip my toe in or whether I should dip it anywhere at all. I grew up in simpler times when Central Scotland, and the old Lanarkshire in particular, the people ate slept and drank Labour and had Labour labels on everything they dressed in. Even in chapel it was difficult to get away from the political bent of (I chose my words EXTREMELY carefully there) the clergy who saw Labour then as the standard bearers of justice and equality, particularly for the then still oppressed working man. Morally, therefore, they would have seen their position as unequivocal, not that parishioners would question priests in those days. So, I have a very conditioned and heavily influenced political mind now. On the one hand I struggle to combat the potentially poisonous politics of my youth; am frustrated by the lack of good choice elsewhere on the other; and now toy with becoming a-political as the only feasible alternative. Yet, in the midst of all of this turmoil, the voice of conscience niggles telling me it is a duty to contribute to the betterment of our society. And therein lies the nub. Niggle or not I simply can not pin my colours to any current political ideology never mind a party.
    When it comes to Scottish independence, the pain of choice can be excruciating. I have neither enough knowledge of the issues nor the arguments. You who still live there understand far more clearly than I ever could. Nor am I involved in the choices available to you. Some might say, therefore, that living elsewhere extinguishes my right to have a say. I agree absolutely that I have no right to vote but I am certain you will welcome my ramblings from a distance. Perhaps Scots like me who straddle a fence in the open field may see clearer than those in the misty glen.
    As I see it, the issue revolves round one’s interpretation of independence. It can hardly be true that those who call for total independence for Scotland can actually mean total. No country or individual even can be absolutely independent. Every country in this world of ours depends one way or another on others. It is as true of England and Scotland as it is of American and The Gulf States or China and India. It is imperative, therefore, when considering options, not to be deceived by terminology and especially that which plays on sentiment or emotions. For me, independence would be the freedom of decision making, the right to determine my present and future status and well-being. It would not and could not exclude the influence and dictates of others.
    This having been said, I well understand those Scots who see the current links with England as fetters rather than allegiances. Political and economic cooperation appears to be more like subversively controlled domination, even slavery. Certainly there are very good historical arguments that strongly support this view. However, I am not convinced they hold true in present day arrangements. What we do have today in this Anglo-Scottish alliance is an obviously dominant partner with the power to ultimately determine the political, social and economic future of the other. That this is unjust is not in dispute. No country should have the fate of another completely in its hands. It is entitled to lend support, to strongly advise but true freedom is recognising the right of any country to make absolutely independent decisions about its own fate. I do contend that this is probably what is really meant by those who seek Scottish independence.
    There is no doubt that in the past Scotland has felt the heavy hand of English imperialism as hard if not harder than any other British “colony”, and, let us face it, that is what Scotland currently is. It is not alone in the world today, for the old imperial method of military submission has long been replaced by the underhand manipulations of economic dependency and vast numbers of countries are at its mercy. Even Great Britain itself is entangled in its undergrowth unable to make genuinely independent decisions without the approval of major nations whose powerful business and financial magnates dictate how every dog, including their own, must bark. In this world of economic blackmail and political abduction, might the wise man not consider the benefits of joint action by close and long standing neighbours as a stronger defence against domination than a stand- alone policy? Personally, I think it is a initiative that needs reflection.
    To turn to the potentially thorny issue of an independent Ireland leading to a threatening immigration of ancestral Scots. I do believe that Scotland would be the natural country of resettlement for many Ulstermen. In my opinion, the violent expressions of sectarianism have lurked in the dark recesses of West Central Scotland for years never quite escalating as yet onto the open streets. The fact that some people from Northern Ireland who found it impossible not keep the lid on theirs could have a serious impact on the volatility of Scottish sectarianism is a cause for extreme concern. It may be that I am allowing unfounded fears to dominate my thinking but I would rather be aware than be caught unprepared. In addition, one has to question the right of emigrants, no matter their historical links, to demand entry to any country of choice. Given the high risk of serious social problems, JasCam may be correct in proposing a curb on a potential free-for-all. Just as history should not be the sole rational in directing an immigration policy, so it should not be the main influence in voting for or against Scottish independence, no matter what side of my fence you fall on.
    H H

    1. Excellent comment again Pensionerbhoy, plenty of food for thought. I feel if we are going to be an independent nation we really need to face up to the genuine sectarian divisions that still exist in our country.
      Happily this is a receding problem but it has not gone away. If we embark on this new adventure I would be happier if we done our best to ensure this problem is addressed.
      We will never have the perfect start to a new nation but we should strive together to give all residents of Scotland hope that the future brings prosperity and equality.
      Thanks again for your comment. #HH

      1. JasCam
        I just wanted to add that it really is extremely sad that in the midst of a debate about the benefits of voting for or against Scottish independence, the issue of sectarianism and the potentially violent consequences should still pray on the minds of voters. It is sickening that decent people may choose to vote based on sectarian consequences rather than the best future for the country. Fear and threat make truly awful bedfellows.
        H H

  14. JasCam
    I am absolutely Scottish through and through. I do not feel that way for any nationalistic reasons as I find they are stuffed full with emotion and rarely with substance or rational. They actually tend to annoy me. I do so, rather, because I have a respect for and pride in the society that weaned me and a deeply founded love of the local environment and wider landscapes of the country in which I was privileged to grow. Living in the North East of England as I have now for over fifteen years, I find myself, somewhat paradoxically, proclaiming even greater fondness of that wonderful land in spite of all the present internal upheavals. I do believe that, if genuine, it is only a reaction to the English thing. It is probably more likely to be a twisted personal wind-up ploy of mine.
    In spite of “mouthing” a great deal about politics, when it really comes down to it, I have to confess that I waiver a great deal as I am never sure which camp I should dip my toe in or whether I should dip it anywhere at all. I grew up in simpler times when Central Scotland, and the old Lanarkshire in particular, the people ate slept and drank Labour and had Labour labels on everything they dressed in. Even in chapel it was difficult to get away from the political bent of (I chose my words EXTREMELY carefully there) the clergy who saw Labour then as the standard bearers of justice and equality, particularly for the then still oppressed working man. Morally, therefore, they would have seen their position as unequivocal, not that parishioners would question priests in those days. So, I have a very conditioned and heavily influenced political mind now. On the one hand I struggle to combat the potentially poisonous politics of my youth; am frustrated by the lack of good choice elsewhere on the other; and now toy with becoming a-political as the only feasible alternative. Yet, in the midst of all of this turmoil, the voice of conscience niggles telling me it is a duty to contribute to the betterment of our society. And therein lies the nub. Niggle or not I simply can not pin my colours to any current political ideology never mind a party.
    When it comes to Scottish independence, the pain of choice can be excruciating. I have neither enough knowledge of the issues nor the arguments. You who still live there understand far more clearly than I ever could. Nor am I involved in the choices available to you. Some might say, therefore, that living elsewhere extinguishes my right to have a say. I agree absolutely that I have no right to vote but I am certain you will welcome my ramblings from a distance. Perhaps Scots like me who straddle a fence in the open field may see clearer than those in the misty glen.
    As I see it, the issue revolves round one’s interpretation of independence. It can hardly be true that those who call for total independence for Scotland can actually mean total. No country or individual even can be absolutely independent. Every country in this world of ours depends one way or another on others. It is as true of England and Scotland as it is of American and The Gulf States or China and India. It is imperative, therefore, when considering options, not to be deceived by terminology and especially that which plays on sentiment or emotions. For me, independence would be the freedom of decision making, the right to determine my present and future status and well-being. It would not and could not exclude the influence and dictates of others.
    This having been said, I well understand those Scots who see the current links with England as fetters rather than allegiances. Political and economic cooperation appears to be more like subversively controlled domination, even slavery. Certainly there are very good historical arguments that strongly support this view. However, I am not convinced they hold true in present day arrangements. What we do have today in this Anglo-Scottish alliance is an obviously dominant partner with the power to ultimately determine the political, social and economic future of the other. That this is unjust is not in dispute. No country should have the fate of another completely in its hands. It is entitled to lend support, to strongly advise but true freedom is recognising the right of any country to make absolutely independent decisions about its own fate. I do contend that this is probably what is really meant by those who seek Scottish independence.
    There is no doubt that in the past Scotland has felt the heavy hand of English imperialism as hard if not harder than any other British “colony”, and, let us face it, that is what Scotland currently is. It is not alone in the world today, for the old imperial method of military submission has long been replaced by the underhand manipulations of economic dependency and vast numbers of countries are at its mercy. Even Great Britain itself is entangled in its undergrowth unable to make genuinely independent decisions without the approval of major nations whose powerful business and financial magnates dictate how every dog, including their own, must bark. In this world of economic blackmail and political abduction, might the wise man not consider the benefits of joint action by close and long standing neighbours as a stronger defence against domination than a stand- alone policy? Personally, I think it is a initiative that needs reflection.
    To turn to the potentially thorny issue of an independent Ireland leading to a threatening immigration of ancestral Scots. I do believe that Scotland would be the natural country of resettlement for many Ulstermen. In my opinion, the violent expressions of sectarianism have lurked in the dark recesses of West Central Scotland for years never quite escalating as yet onto the open streets. The fact that some people from Northern Ireland who found it impossible not keep the lid on theirs could have a serious impact on the volatility of Scottish sectarianism is a cause for extreme concern. It may be that I am allowing unfounded fears to dominate my thinking but I would rather be aware than be caught unprepared. In addition, one has to question the right of emigrants, no matter their historical links, to demand entry to any country of choice. Given the high risk of serious social problems, JasCam may be correct in proposing a curb on a potential free-for-all. Just as history should not be the sole rational in directing an immigration policy, so it should not be the main influence in voting for or against Scottish independence, no matter what side of my fence you fall on.
    H H

    1. Excellent comment again Pensionerbhoy, plenty of food for thought. I feel if we are going to be an independent nation we really need to face up to the genuine sectarian divisions that still exist in our country.
      Happily this is a receding problem but it has not gone away. If we embark on this new adventure I would be happier if we done our best to ensure this problem is addressed.
      We will never have the perfect start to a new nation but we should strive together to give all residents of Scotland hope that the future brings prosperity and equality.
      Thanks again for your comment. #HH

      1. JasCam
        I just wanted to add that it really is extremely sad that in the midst of a debate about the benefits of voting for or against Scottish independence, the issue of sectarianism and the potentially violent consequences should still pray on the minds of voters. It is sickening that decent people may choose to vote based on sectarian consequences rather than the best future for the country. Fear and threat make truly awful bedfellows.
        H H

  15. Good debate, and a good taste of differing opinions. I only replied to the topic in my way because off what JasCam said below.
    “Ulster Scots’ will attempt to move back to Scotland and inflame the sectarian divide that we have at present. This could lead to civil unrest in Scotland especially the west of Scotland and Glasgow in particular”
    This would be a concern if it happened.
    As I said I have no desire to enjoy politics or like them.
    They would fill our jails majority of them.
    Many are as bent as a 2 bob note.
    Good opinions and good debate non the less.
    I hope people with a bigger grasp and understanding of Politics comes in
    and schools us all. We need real debate here. As this is really just a starter for 10.
    As we approach the vote on 2014, it will get a bit nasty and hate filled.
    Great Blog.

  16. Good debate, and a good taste of differing opinions. I only replied to the topic in my way because off what JasCam said below.
    “Ulster Scots’ will attempt to move back to Scotland and inflame the sectarian divide that we have at present. This could lead to civil unrest in Scotland especially the west of Scotland and Glasgow in particular”
    This would be a concern if it happened.
    As I said I have no desire to enjoy politics or like them.
    They would fill our jails majority of them.
    Many are as bent as a 2 bob note.
    Good opinions and good debate non the less.
    I hope people with a bigger grasp and understanding of Politics comes in
    and schools us all. We need real debate here. As this is really just a starter for 10.
    As we approach the vote on 2014, it will get a bit nasty and hate filled.
    Great Blog.

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